Tuesday, January 3, 2012

My Brief History of Bruce (Rory)

In this series of posts, we will give you some background on how your three lovely bloggers became Springsteen fans. First up, Rory:

In what would seem stunning to most people, I didn't give a crap about music from the age of 12 through 16. While these are usually formative years for most people's music tastes, I was more obsessed with comic books and basketball. I had a brief affair with Hootie and the Blowfish in 1995, but that taught me the harsh lesson that "cool" comes and goes in the blink of an eye. In addition, it was too expensive to keep up with all the latest crazes. CDs and CD players were outrageously expensive, especially considering the vastly superior music formats and players we currently have at mostly lower prices.

Then, in 1999, Bruce reunited back with the E Street Band, and he was all over the news. My mom went to his concert in Madison Square Garden in the summer of 2000, and would constantly rave about him. I had been working part time at a comic book store, which had the radio station blaring Q104.3, New York's classic rock station. So, I did enjoy the genre, and was vaguely familiar with some of Springsteen's work. When my mom brought home Springsteen's Live in New York album in 2001, I decided "I will now become a Springsteen fan." Bruce didn't disappoint, as that album, in addition with The Rising, was the perfect way to win over a new fan like myself.

With this, I finally began to develop what one woud call "musical taste". After exploring Bruce's work, I became a fan of many other classic rock musicians (Beatles, Bowie, Queen, etc.). I sought out the bands that both influenced, and drew inspiration from, these musicians. Springsteen's work reintroduced me to music as a whole, and without him, I wouldn't be the loveable karoake crooner I become after several drinks.

Rory's Stats
Favorite Song: Atlantic City
Favorite Album: Darkness On The Edge of Town
Number of Bruce Concerts Attended: 7
Least Favorite Song: A Night With The Jersey Devil